What is Tempeh?
Unearthed centuries ago on the island of Java, Indonesia, tempeh is a cultured, whole food traditionally made from soybeans. Tempeh’s fermentation process uses a culture that thrives in the tropical Indonesian climate that creates a firm and versatile loaf that is highly nutritious and unbelievably tasty.

The Brinery’s tempeh is the only raw, unpasteurized tempeh made in the Midwest. Unlike pasteurized commercial tempeh found in the refrigerator aisle, we freeze our tempeh immediately after fermentation, resulting in a superior nutty flavor, meaty texture, and unparalleled freshness.

About our Process
Using age-old fermentation techniques with modern adaptations, we create our artisanal tempeh by first fermenting our beans via a simple soak. Next, the beans are cooked, inoculated with a pure Rhizopus culture and incubated in a climate similar to Indonesia. During incubation, the culture blooms to incase the beans into a white, firm loaf. Finally, our tempeh is frozen fresh— raw and unpasteurized —for the best taste possible.

Health Benefit
Our twice fermentation process breaks down complex starches associated with the indigestion of the legume family and other soy products like tofu. The result is an easily digestible super food that is packed with accessible nutrients. Tempeh is a high protein and high fiber option for vegetarians and omnivores alike. It’s also full of health-promoting phytochemicals!


Proper Handling

  • Raw and unpasteurized and must be kept frozen
  • Both varieties are sold in 12 pack cases of 1 pound loaves. Each loaf is approximately 4” X 8” and measure 1” thick. The loaves can be easily sliced, cubed, or crumbled after they are thawed.
  • 6-month shelf life frozen.
  • Tempeh can be thawed overnight in a refrigerator or a counter for 3-4 hours. Once thawed, it keeps in the refrigerator for 5 days.

 

Products We Offer

Traditional Tempeh
(Organic, non-GMO soybeans, live active cultures)
While non-fermented soy is difficult to digest, our twice-fermented tempeh is full of available nutrients, proving one of the best ways to eat and digest soy. This tempeh is characterized by a savory, nutty flavor and is great marinated on sandwiches, in stir-fries, or as a fried appetizer.

Black Bean Tempeh  
(Organic, non-GMO black beans, live active cultures)
This variety has a sweeter flavor and aroma and is excellent grilled, baked, and sautéed and added to a number of meals including in chili, burgers, tacos or as a salad topping.


FAQS

How is The Brinery’s tempeh different from commercial tempeh?
The Brinery’s tempeh is the only raw, unpasteurized tempeh made in the Midwest. Unlike pasteurized commercial tempeh found in the refrigerator aisle, we freeze our tempeh fresh, immediately after fermentation, resulting in tempeh with a superior nutty flavor, meaty texture, and unparalleled freshness.

We offer two varieties of tempeh, both made from organically grown, non-GMO beans and grain sourced from Michigan. Both varieties are sold in one pound loaves that can be easily sliced, cubed, or crumbled after they are thawed.

Is tempeh gluten free?
Yes, both our varieties of tempeh are free of gluten. We do not, however, operate in a gluten-free facility.

Is tempeh vegan/vegetarian?
Yes. Tempeh does not contain any animal products. Tempeh is made with just a few ingredients: organic beans and/or grain in addition to the culture responsible for the fermentation process.

Where do you source your beans and grain?
We proudly source all of our certified organic and non-GMO beans and grain locally from farmers in Michigan.

How long does tempeh keep?
It is best to use frozen tempeh within 6 months. Thaw tempeh overnight in a refrigerator or a counter for 3-4 hours. Once thawed, it keeps in the refrigerator for 5 days.

Can you refreeze tempeh after it is thawed?
We don’t recommend refreezing tempeh after it is thawed. Our unpasteurized tempeh is still alive and continues to ferment after thawing.

Are black or gray spots a sign that tempeh has gone bad?
No, black and gray spots are entirely natural to find on fully-ripened and more flavorful tempeh. These spots occur when the tempeh culture begins sporulation as the fermentation cycle completes and the culture matures. This is common after you take your tempeh out of the freezer to thaw as the loaf is then exposed to more air.

 

Submit any additional questions to us at: orders@thebrinery.com